When I think of bangers and mash, I think of sausages smothered in gravy on creamy mashed potatoes. It’s a classic comfort food that should never be messed with – but of course I had to come along and muck around. 🙂

Comfort foods are wonderful.

Yup, I am aware that it is summer and it’s too warm out for comfort foods but why limit it to cold and dreary days? 🙂 Tasty foods should be had all year round! ’nuff said.

 

Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)

 

If you never heard of bangers and mash, it is a traditional dish from United Kingdom made of sausages, mashed potatoes and smothered with gravy.

Sounds fantastic right?

However most of the time, comfort food to me should be easily eaten with one utensil and served in one bowl and usually wrapped in a cozy blanket in front of the TV. Sausages can be unwieldy and usually need to be cut or bit off piece by piece – and then there’s that fear of the initial bite where hot grease can potentially squirt out and burn your face (ouch?) so I decided to muck around with the classic recipe to make it easier to eat. 😛

The result?

Bite-sized sausages over a roasted garlic mashed potato smothered in a beer and onion gravy!

 

 

INGREDIENTS

All ingredients can be found at your local grocery store.

 

Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)

 

For the mashed potatoes, I used milk however if you want to go the healthier route you substitute this for chicken broth but it will be slightly less creamy.

 

I switch up my potatoes when it comes to mashed potatoes. To be honest, I haven’t found a type that really stands out! For this recipe I used russet potatoes but please let me know your preference because I can’t seem to tell the difference in flavour! 🙂

 

Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)

 

For the sausages, anything goes. Usually I like to keep it to a simple pork sausage.

For the gravy, we used a dark beer to give it a bit more flavour. (Stouts, Porters or any dark beer.) However depending on how dark and strong the beer is, it may give the gravy a bit of a bitter kick. To reduce the bitter kick, we added 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of maple syrup.

 

To thicken the gravy, a cornstarch slurry was used instead of a flour roux. I find this method a lot easier to control how thick the gravy comes out since you can add it in at the end a little bit at a time. Also, no lumps! Just make sure to mix the slurry well before adding it into the gravy. Oh and the water MUST be cold for it to mix well.

 

 

PUTTING IT TOGETHER

Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Roast the Garlic!

I don’t know about you but I personally don’t roast whole garlic bulbs because I know it goes to waste. Don’t get me wrong, roasted garlic is wonderful and can pretty much go in anything but generally I like to roast what I use. There is a method for this! 🙂

  1. Separate the cloves but don’t peel it. Leave it in it’s skin. (My rule of thumb for garlic potatoes is 1 clove per potato. That gives the potatoes that hint of roasted flavour without overpowering it.)
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
  2. Make sure the garlic cloves are similar in size, else the smaller ones will be crispy almost borderline burnt while the bigger ones won’t be fully soft during the roasting process. (Yep! I had some crispy burnt garlics! Blech)
  3. Toss the garlic in oil.
  4. Set the oven to 400F (204C)
  5. In a pan with parchment paper, put the garlic in and roast it. I keep it in for 10 minutes for smaller cloves and 15-20 minutes for larger cloves but check at the 10 minute mark to see if it has browned and soften before adding extra time to it since ovens and garlic sizes vary.
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
  6. You’ll know it’s done when its golden brown.
  7. Peel the skins off and remove the hard nubs on the bottom end (Those are not always fun to eat.) and set aside.

Peel & Mash the Potatoes!

  1. Scrub the potatoes to remove the dirt.
  2. In a large pot, add in bay leaves and the potatoes
  3. Add enough water to the pot to cover the potatoes.
    (Optional: Add some salt to the water)
  4. Set the stove to medium high heat and cook the potatoes for 30-40 minutes. (This will vary depending on the size of the potatoes.
  5. You’ll know it’s done when you can insert a knife into it smoothly and it doesn’t feel like a crunchy apple in the middle.
  6. Drain the water out of the pot.
  7. To peel potatoes easily, set aside a bowl of cold water and make a slit around the potatoes.
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
  8. Dunk the potato in the cold water and let it sit for about 5 minutes or so.
  9. Once you notice the potato skin slightly separate from the potatoes, grab it from each end and slide the skin outwards! Magic! A peeled potato!
    (Note: I usually just keep the skins on, gives it a bit more flavour and nutrients! So peeling the potato is optional.)
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
  10. In a bowl, combine the roasted garlic, milk, butter and potatoes and start mashing! Mash it lots for a creamier mashed potato – Mash it less for a chunky rustic mashed potato! 🙂
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
  11. Add salt to taste (not too much, the gravy has salt too! :)) and set the mashed potatoes a side for later.
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)

 

Sausage & Gravy Time!
  1. With a sharp knife, make a slit down the sausage and remove the meat and break it up into small pieces. Discard the casing.
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
  2. In a large skillet pan, set the stove to medium high heat and cook the sausage for 20 minutes or until cooked through and brown.
  3. Once the sausage is done, remove the sausage from the pan and set aside. Leave the drippings in the pan.
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
  4. Add the onions into the pan and set the stove to medium low heat. Cook this down until it is brown and caramelized. It should take about 15 minutes.
  5. Once the onion is brown and caramelized, add in the beef stock and beer and cook it let it simmer for about 5-10 minutes to allow the flavours to meld.
  6. In a small bowl combine 1 tablespoon and 1/4 teaspoon of cornstarch with 1 tablespoon and 1/4 teaspoon of cold water and mix well to remove any lumps in the slurry.
  7. Slowly add it into the gravy. Keep stirring to distribute the cornstarch while you are adding it in so it doesn’t solidify into a solid jelly goop!
  8. Optional : Stir in the maple syrup
  9. In a bowl, combine the potatoes, sausage and gravy and dig in! 🙂
    Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)

 

“Want to share?” said no one ever…

 

 

Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
5 from 3 votes
Print
Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
1 hrs 10 mins
Total Time
1 hrs 15 mins
 

Bite-sized sausages over a roasted garlic mashed potato smothered in a beer and onion gravy

Course: Main Course
Cuisine: British
Servings: 3
Author: Pups with Chopsticks
Ingredients
Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes
  • 4-5 medium potatoes
  • 4-5 cloves garlic
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 3-4 bay leaves
  • 1 cup milk
  • salt (to taste)
Sausage & Gravy
  • 3 sausages
  • 1 onion
  • 2 1/2 cup beef stock
  • 1/2 cup dark beer
  • 3/4 tbsp soy sauce (to taste)
  • 1/4-1/2 tsp maple syrup
Gravy Thickener
  • 1 tbsp corn starch (+1/4 teaspoon)
  • 1 tbsp cold water (+1/4 teaspoon)
Instructions
Roasting the Garlic
  1. Separate the cloves but don’t peel it. Leave it in it’s skin. (My rule of thumb for garlic potatoes is 1 clove per potato. That gives the potatoes that hint of roasted flavour without overpowering it.)

  2. Make sure the garlic cloves are similar in size, else the smaller ones will be crispy almost borderline burnt while the bigger ones won’t be fully soft during the roasting process.

  3. Toss the garlic in oil.

  4. Set the oven to 400F (204C)

  5. In a pan with parchment paper, put the garlic in and roast it. I keep it in for 10 minutes for smaller cloves and 15-20 minutes for larger cloves but check at the 10 minute mark to see if it has browned and soften before adding extra time to it since ovens and garlic sizes vary.

  6. You’ll know it’s done when its golden brown.

  7. Peel the skins off and remove the hard nubs on the bottom end (Those are not always fun to eat.) and set aside.

Peeling & Mashing the Potatoes
  1. Scrub the potatoes to remove the dirt.

  2. In a large pot, add in bay leaves and the potatoes

  3. Add enough water to the pot to cover the potatoes.
    (Optional: Add some salt to the water)

  4. Set the stove to medium high heat and cook the potatoes for 30-40 minutes. (This will vary depending on the size of the potatoes.

  5. You’ll know it’s done when you can insert a knife into it smoothly and it doesn’t feel like a crunchy apple in the middle.

  6. Drain the water out of the pot.

  7. To peel potatoes easily, set aside a bowl of cold water and make a slit around the potatoes.

  8. Dunk the potato in the cold water and let it sit for about 5 minutes or so.

  9. Once you notice the potato skin slightly separate from the potatoes, grab it from each end and slide the skin outwards! Magic! A peeled potato!

    (Note: I usually just keep the skins on, gives it a bit more flavour and nutrients! So peeling the potato is optional.)

  10. In a bowl, combine the roasted garlic, milk, butter and potatoes and start mashing! Mash it lots for a creamier mashed potato – Mash it less for a chunky rustic mashed potato! 🙂
  11. Add salt to taste (not too much, the gravy has salt too! :)) and set the mashed potatoes a side for later.

Sausage & Gravy
  1. With a sharp knife, make a slit down the sausage and remove the meat and break it up into small pieces. Discard the casing.

  2. In a large skillet pan, set the stove to medium high heat and cook the sausage for 20 minutes or until cooked through and brown.

  3. Once the sausage is done, remove the sausage from the pan and set aside. Leave the drippings in the pan.

  4. Add the onions into the pan and set the stove to medium low heat. Cook this down until it is brown and caramelized. It should take about 15 minutes.

  5. Once the onion is brown and caramelized, add in the beef stock and beer and cook it let it simmer for about 5-10 minutes to allow the flavours to meld.

  6. In a small bowl combine 1 tablespoon and 1/4 teaspoon of cornstarch with 1 tablespoon and 1/4 teaspoon of cold water and mix well to remove any lumps in the slurry.

  7. Slowly add it into the gravy. Keep stirring to distribute the cornstarch while you are adding it in so it doesn’t solidify into a solid jelly goop!

  8. [Optional] Stir in the maple syrup

  9. In a bowl, combine the potatoes, sausage and gravy and dig in! 🙂

 

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest220Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Yummly23Share on StumbleUpon181Email this to someone

14 thoughts on “Bangers and Mash (Deconstructed)”

  1. Yes, I’m right there with you on comfort food all year round! Especially when it’s as comforting as this bangers and mash! Love this easier to eat version you made!

  2. Yes. All the yes. I rarely cook, but your recipes are inspiring me enough to cook more! Your Chinese-style Beer Braised Pork Belly was incredible and I definitely want to try this soon. Also, love the bowl!

  3. My husband would LOVE this. Once this heatwave passes on through (seriously, 113 degrees is NOT cooking weather!) I’ll have to whip up this comforting dinner. Maybe he’ll even take out the trash when I ask him to. 😉

    1. Eep! That’s insane heat! I think I would die in that haha! Wait, you mean all this time I could have used food to bribe him to do chores? I’ve been doing this all wrong! haha 🙂

  4. When I look at this fantastic photo , ingredients are easy to make this dish. Thank you to bring this up, so that I can cook for my family.

  5. anything deconstructed is fancyyyy in my eyes! i personally like the texture of russets more than yukon gold/etc in mashed potatoes because i feel like they’re a little less dense, but i also never say no to mashed potatoes (; especially if it has roasted garlic!

    1. haha you’d be surprised how un-fancy this is. It’s just nice to have nice bite sized sausages with every spoonful of mashed potatoes! I am a carb fiend. I love all the carbs and all the potatoes haha

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *