Brushed with sweet and savoury glaze, packed with umami from the black garlic – these black garlic miso glazed eggplants (Nasu Dengaku) are quick and easy to make as a delicious snack or appetizer.

When it comes to veggies, I am usually the first one at the table to either stuff my face with it so I have my ‘quota’ in for the week – did it as a kid, still do it now. So whenever I find a vegetable I enjoy, I eat it every possible way – to death. It’s too bad eggplant isn’t a vegetable (Yep! it’s a fruit) so doesn’t technically count as meeting my vegetable quota for the week.

 

Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)

 

Whenever I mention the word eggplant, it’s usually not surprising how many people don’t enjoy it, why? I honestly will never know.

 

Eggplant is creamy, slightly sweet and when it has has a chance to be roasted and caramelized in the oven and smeared with a umami-packed black garlic miso glaze – I’m usually the first one at the table to polish it off. Sorry – no sharing allowed here. So all you eggplant cringers out there, give this one a try! I’ll consider it a success if you manage to at least enjoy the glaze. πŸ™‚

 

Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)

 

INGREDIENTS

For this recipe, I used both Chinese and Indian eggplant. Chinese eggplant might be available at your local grocery store or specialty grocery store but if you cannot find them then they will most likely be at a Asian restaurant.

 

Mirin, cooking sake and miso would also be available at an Asian grocery store or specialty grocery store.

 

I used red miso (aka miso) because I enjoy the stronger ‘punch in your face’ flavours of miso. You can switch up your miso to a lighter one if you prefer a milder glaze.

 

Black garlic is a bit trickier to find. It can be found at specialty grocery stores but if you cannot find it in stores, you can find it online as easily.

 

Disclaimer: As with most of my posts, I provide affiliate links to make items easier to find if you cannot purchase this locally. I would never recommend anything I don’t own myself or highly recommend, but I would prefer you buy your items locally to support your stores (and chances are they are cheaper locally!)Β πŸ™‚

 

Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)

 

Chinese Eggplant vs Indian Eggplant

Both eggplants are quite similar but I did find a few subtle differences between the two. Indian eggplants have a very slight tang to it and it has a bit more seeds which makes sense – they have to pack all those seeds somewhere in that cute little egg shaped thing! πŸ™‚ Other than that they both created an equally delicious dish and I would highly recommend using them interchangeably! πŸ™‚

 

Learn more about these 2 eggplants:

 

PUTTING IT TOGETHER

Making the Black Garlic Miso Glaze
  1. In a food processor put in the black garlic, water, mirin, sake and miso and blitz it until it is smooth. (If you prefer a thinner glaze, add 1 tablespoon of water)
  2. Set the glaze aside for later.
Prepping the Eggplant
  1. Make length wise cuts running down the eggplant, 1/2 inch apart. I found it easiest to use a pairing knife or a small knife to make these cuts.
    Simple version : Cut the eggplants in half, length wise.
    Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)
  2. Lightly oil the skin and between the slits and run your fingers through it so the oil is spread to a thin layer.Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)
Roasting it
  1. Line your cookie sheet with parchment and fan out the eggplant. Some may not like to fan out easily, don’t worry when it starts to soften up it will be easier to fan out. πŸ™‚
  2. Set your oven to broil. (Whenever you do any kind of broiling, watch it like a hawk because things burn in that setting.) and put the eggplant in the oven.
  3. Flip the eggplant every 2 minutes, 2-3 times. (Approximately 4-6 minutes a side)
  4. When the eggplant looks brown and roasted, brush on the glaze and put it back in the broiler for 2 minutes.
    Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)
  5. Top it with some sesame seeds and green onions and enjoy~! πŸ™‚

 

Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)

Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)

 

Oh, and if you have extra glaze – don’t throw it out! I tried grilling meats and topping it with the glaze at the end and it tasted amazing! πŸ™‚ Try it out!

 

Yes! Veggie intake quota met for the week! (I won’t tell if you won’t tell! πŸ˜‰ )

Print

Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)


  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Yield: 4 Servings
  • Category: Appetizer, Side, Snack
  • Cuisine: Japanese

Description

Brushed with sweet and savoury glaze packed with umami from the black garlic – these black garlic miso glazed eggplants (Nasu Dengaku) are quick and easy to make as a delicious snack or appetizer.


Ingredients

  • 6 chinese eggplants
  • oil (flavourless – canola, peanut, vegetable)

Black Garlic Miso Glaze

Toppings

  • green onions (julienne)
  • toasted sesame seeds

Instructions

Making the Black Garlic Miso

  1. In a food processor put in the black garlic, water, mirin, sake and miso and blitz it until it is smooth. (If you prefer a thinner glaze, add 1 more tablespoon of water)
  2. Set the glaze aside for later.

Prepping the Eggplant

  1. Make length wise cuts running down the eggplant, 1/2 inch apart. I found it easiest to use a pairing knife or a small knife to make these cuts.
    Simple versionΒ : Cut the eggplants in half, length wise.
  2. Lightly oil the skin and between the slits and run your fingers through it so the oil is spread to a thin layer.

Roasting It

  1. Line your cookie sheet with parchment and fan out the eggplant. Some may not like to fan out easily, don’t worry when it starts to soften up it will be easier to fan out.
  2. Set your oven to broil. (Whenever you do any kind of broiling, watch it like a hawk because things burn in that setting.) and put the eggplant in the oven.
  3. Flip the eggplant every 2 minutes, 2-3 times. (Approximately 4-6 minutes a side)
  4. When the eggplant looks brown and roasted, brush on the glaze and put it back in the broiler for 2 minutes.
  5. Top it with some sesame seeds and green onions and enjoy~!Β πŸ™‚

Notes

If you have extra glaze – save it! We tested it on grilled meats and it tasted fantastic! Give it a try! πŸ™‚

 

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13 thoughts on “Black Garlic Miso Glazed Eggplant (Nasu Dengaku)”

    1. πŸ™‚ The neat thing I recently found out was the glaze can do double duty and is awesome with meat as well! πŸ™‚

    1. It’s pretty neat! I had no idea myself until I found it and started to play with it a bit. I see dozens of different kinds of eggplant seeds whenever I go to buy my seeds for the garden so there must be a gajillion kinds of eggplant but these one (and the italian one) seem to be the most popular in stores so why not try them all πŸ™‚

  1. I am a fan of eggplant but my husband refuses to eat it. I’ve seen both Indian and Chinese eggplant in my local store, I just never knew the differenceβ€”now I do!

    1. haha it’s the same way with Terry as well. Then I made him actually try it and he’s finally been converted – after a couple of years haha.

  2. Wow Joyce! This looks absolutely incredible. . .although I must admit i am not a big eggplant fan myself. . .not that I hate it. . .but I think I must have had some bad eggplant at one time or another and that has stuck with me. That being said, this makes me want to run out to my store and buy eggplant this very minute. And since the hubby is a huge eggplant fan. . .I know that would be A-OK with him. P.S. I had no idea eggplant was a fruit. P.S.S. I don’t think I have ever seen black garlic.

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